April 2012


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Click on the photos to see full-screen-sized images.

I left a lot of these photos dark. They are best viewed full size – you can see more detail. Some of them are quite lovely, if I do say so myself.  You get to fill them in with the colors and light of your own imagination. It was fun for me just to think about line / design / subject elements within the pictures. I like the moodiness, too – that’s something you have to deal with in this sunshine-deprived part of the world. I didn’t invent the darkness; I just wanted to portray it… lol

La Conner and this area are really quite charming. I don’t mean to disparage it. It gets a little touristy this time of year… but it’s very much an arts and crafts kind of community. It was fun to sit with a friend in a little local joint on the water and have a hamburger with all the local people. Or rather, to try to figure out who were locals and who were “visitors”.

Across the Swinomish Channel is the Swinomish Reservation and fishing port. Standing outside for a while, taking these pictures, it was instructional to watch the fisherman loading gear onto their boats. It looked like they were loading cages to fish for crabs.

A bald eagle swooped down low over the water, heading toward the bridge. It caused quite a commotion among the seagulls. Seagulls and crows will band together and flock against the larger predator birds. It was quite scenic. Then the eagle flew way up high and wheeled around above me, too far to get a photo as the rain started to sprinkle down.

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for sale

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for sale by owner

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lifeboat

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Picnic shelters on Swinomish tribal lands made in the style of traditional woven-cedar hats (across from La Conner)

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La Conner main drag – on Puget Sound

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Crabbing boat getting ready to go out – Swinomish tribal  lands across from La Conner.

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seagulls

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This friendly seagull sat out on that piling, right outside the cafe window. I love seagulls and birds…

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Rainbow Bridge is a La Connor landmark, so I had to include it. From the tulip fields, just head southwest towards this bridge… Also, pencil some time in to go see Deception Pass, especially if you haven’t been. At Deception Pass is a bridge that goes from the mainland to Whidby Island. Way far below is a huge wide channel of swift waters. It’s a spectacular vista, truly a wonder of nature.

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taken at Tulip Town fields west of Mt. Vernon, WA

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on the diagonal

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coming up

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coming up, close-up

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big pink

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tulip field tour with tractor and wagon

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another enthusiast – his camera’s bigger than mine 😦 lol

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“neon tulips” – blooming tulips with camera effect

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Cherry blossoms. If you click on the pictures, the frame will fill up to the size of your whole computer screen. The first one is my favorite. I love the way these came out.

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“Journalism without a moral position is impossible. Every journalist is a moralist. It’s absolutely unavoidable. A journalist is someone who looks at the world and the way it works, someone who takes a close look at things every day and reports what she sees, someone who represents the world, the event, for others. She cannot do her work without judging what she sees.”    – a quote from Marguerite Duras (b. 1914), French author, filmmaker. Outside: Selected Writings, foreword (1984)    – as seen on Quotes @ dictionary.com

This quotation jibes with my own beliefs and point of view. For me, it speaks to the human condition – in the parade of life, there are no spectators.

Speaking of opinions, I think that not enough people have ’em. Too often what passes for an opinion is merely a cliche or others’ rehashed ideas. What am I trying to say? Think for yourself and don’t accept other people’s ideas wholesale. Practice critical thinking. There is no patent on ideas.

(third revision)

In my young adulthood, the first time I heard anyone talking about courage as a desirable character trait, it felt very self conscious to me; it didn’t ring true. In my own mind, I’d already worked out what courage was. It didn’t include talking about it, discussing it – which seemed like a conceit. It was something that went beyond the realm of speech; or simply didn’t need to be put in words.

Over time, as I heard people repeatedly speak of courage, it somehow became something that I could aspire to and possess. I believe that it became more deeply instilled in me as a value. It takes courage to live in a complacent world. Yet it makes life so much more interesting.

When people tell me today that I have courage, it can be hard to understand. It’s not a word that I use a lot. It doesn’t seem to relate to anything about my life in particular. What is it about me; or what is it that people think I’ve done?

As regards to my gender identity and sexuality, it’s more a case of stubbornness, bullheadedness. I did not like the choices I was given. With so much of my life already past, I learned the true meaning of codependency (it was not what I’d thought.) I came to believe/understand that we can’t micro-manage other people’s feelings. We can’t “make them happy”‘, etc. We can’t change them. The only person we can change is ourselves. I learned the neat trick of creating choices of my own.

I’ve been called a rebel. It seems to me more to the point. I didn’t like the flow of my life, so I chose to go against it; or rather, to go with my own flow. Surely there’s a joy in that. It’s more in the realm of identity-as-a-concept-in-itself.

If I possess any quality worthy of praise, I think it’s more in a striving to be honest. What others are unwilling to say, I sometimes feel compelled to attempt.

Nevertheless, I feel that courage is one of the highest compliments one can receive. So I must appreciate it.

If you’ve ever been praised in a very thoughtful way and aren’t sure if you should take credit for it – the thoughtfulness and love of the words may yet make you aspire to become that person.

There’s so many kinds of courage. Enough for all.

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walking in Lincoln Park

beside Puget Sound

I stopped to read the dedications

on the park benches

and felt sad

so I stopped reading them.

 

when I die let me pass to ashes

quickly,

unmourned

 

life is transient,

life is eternal

but not for grief,

not for me,

not today.

 

40 minutes’ walk finished

endorphins kicked in

it felt good